Currents June 2014

Did you know that the Great Lakes are the biggest freshwater source in the world? Lake Erie is the most productive for fishing of all the Great Lakes. Your support helps make our streams clean, clear and healthy so they can support this complex ecosystem. By donating to PCS, you help us reach our goals of restoring rivers that lead to Lake Erie beaches that promote fishable and swimmable conditions for generations.

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June 2014

Dave Derrick explains a StreamDave Derrick will be in Toledo July 21st through July 25th to work with river restoration practictioners, students, engineers, and consultants in a team setting for developing conceptual plans for several different projects in the area. “The Stream Restoration Design: An Advanced Workshop” is great for those who “learn by doing” outside of a lecture-based setting. If you have been to a class taught by Dave Derrick before and always wanted to try applying some of the restoration techniques, then this workshop is for you. Half of the workshop time will be spent in the field, in which you’ll receive direction and guidance from a variety of local leaders. This will allow you to practice applying the methods, and work through many of the design considerations. Then take this practical experience and apply it to your own potential projects when you return to your area. View the full agenda HERE.

 

To maximize the field time for this workshop, Dave will not be re-teaching his methods. After a quick review, he will cover some more advanced methods in detail, and hand off to other experts to briefly teach about wetlands, plants, and construction considerations. Class will then head directly into the field to visit relevant restored sites. To keep teams small and allow each team to have computer and classroom space for developing their concepts, we are limiting this workshop to 30 participants. Apply by June 18th and tell us about your interests, experience, and if you have attended a previous “Dave Workshop.” We will select and notify participants quickly. The workshop is only $249 and includes all materials, some light snacks and some lunches. Lodging is not included. Payment is required before attendng the Workshop and can be processed once you have been selected to participate. So go ahead and get started now on the internal approvals you need in order to participate. Apply now by completing this form!

Join us on Thursday, June 19, 2014 to learn how to use the Data Management and Delisting System. Each participant will have access to a computer station and be able to work on the system live as we guide you through instructions and examples.  The Data Management and Delisting System (DMDS) is a critical tool for evaluating the status of the Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs) and for determining the projects and needs that are important for the restoration of the Maumee Area of Concern. For more information about this system, view the webpage here.

The training session will be held at the University of Toledo’s Snyder Memorial room 2170 from 9:00am-12:00pm. Free parking is available in lot 10 next to the tennis courts. Don’t miss this opportunity to be one of the first to use the DMDS and have meaningful input. Seats are limited, so register early! Prior to June 13th, all workshop attendees should visit dmds.maumeerap.org and sign up as a registered user (under the login menu). By becoming a registered user you will be able to actually enter and edit projects live in the system during the workshop. More detailed information will follow regarding what you should bring to the Workshop. Register before June 13th by calling Cherie Blair, Ohio EPA Maumee RAP Coordinator, at 419.373.3010.

Line and Lead is collected from Maumee River Banks The “weight” is over. Get the Lead Out is back and better than ever! Join us by removing derelict fishing gear from the Maumee River this summer. We have over three miles of the Maumee River between Perrysburg and Maumee to cover and remove fishing line, lead, lures, and hooksthat have been left behind bythe anglers. Just last year, PCS volunteers collected 41 pounds of lead sinkers from this 3-mile stretch of river. Groups have already signed up for this volunteer program.

During Get the Lead Out, groups or individuals go out into the Maumee River starting in early June (water level dependent) through August.Everyone is welcome! Bring friends, family, kids, significant others, co-workers, cousins, aunts, uncles, and neighbors. Plan to walk in the Maumee River, along its banks, over logs, through tall grasses, and over rocks collecting lead, line, and trash that have gotten snagged on rocks, branches, and grass. PCS will be planning for large group and staff organized outings in June, July, and August. These events are open to everyone; all experience levels welcome. But you don’t have to wait for one of our outings. Sign your group or family/friends team up for a personalized time that works for you.

Not only do we remove the lead and line, but the material also gets recycled. All collected lead will be reused by ZAP Lures, while the collected fishing line will be recycled with Berkley Fishing and Bass Pro Shops. If you independently collect fishing line or lead and would like it to be recycled, we are happy to process and recycle it for you.

For more information, check out the Get the Lead Out webpage. To get started, sign up your group with Ava at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by calling 419-874-0727.

 

 

Hello everyone! My name is Casey Fuleky and I am Partners for Clean Streams’ new Outreach Intern. In addition to becoming a

Casey near Maumee River

new PCS team member, I am approaching six years with The Olander Park System. From a young age, I embraced a passion towards protecting Earth’s beautiful and natural environments. My growing appreciation for a clean, safe, and healthy planet developed into a priority that I wanted to share with the world around me. It was a very easy decision of mine to pursue a lifelong career in the environmental field. Following my dream, this past spring I graduated from The University of Toledo with an Environmental Studies Degree and a Political Science Concentration.

I am very eager to begin this new and exciting chapter in my life with Partners for Clean Streams. Although I have participated in Clean Your Streams by assisting the Kickoff Coordinator on the day of the event in years past at The Olander Park, I am learning so much more about Clean Your Streams already. I am looking forward to not only expanding my understanding of the ecological services that clean streams, rivers, and lakes provide, but also to helping motivate the public with this newly acquired knowledge. Living out a sustainable and efficient lifestyle is something that all human beings should practice for the happiness of their own future generations and for the wellbeing of Plant Earth as a whole. Partners for Clean Streams works vigorously to promote environmental awareness and make a positive impact on the local waterways, which is why I am very fortunate and excited to be personally involved in this inspiring initiative.

Kris and Ava cleaning at River Rally in Pittsburgh

Not everyone gets excited about sitting in conference rooms for three and half days discussing how to run a non-profit organization dedicated to clean rivers. But we (Kris and Ava) did! And so did over600 other dedicated river lovers from around the world. This time, it was for the National River Rally Conference with River Network in Pittsburgh. We had the chance to join professional river experts and learn countless techniques for preserving our rivers here in our corner of northwest Ohio. Sessions included tips on how to raise money, plan river cleanups, utilize our resources better, involve board members in daily activities, and how to tell others about our unique story. But theoretical learning just didn’t cut it! We, Kris and Ava, also did a trash cleanup (from a kayak) lead by Paddlers without Pollution and discovered that Pittsburgh has much of the same type of urban trash as Toledo does. But as the old adage goes, we “left it better than we found it.”

Not only did we explore ways to improve our waterways,we had the chance to reflect on and celebrate our accomplishments in recent years. Throughout the conference, we networked and shared stories with groups from small rivers in the Appalachian Mountains recovering from mining issues, to groups from the west coast with heavily polluted rivers facing fish population declines, to groups with restored urban rivers in major metropolitan areas, all while putting our Toledo rivers and stories into perspective. We also saw, firsthand, the amazing economic and downtown revival that Pittsburgh has undergone and how central their three rivers were in that revitalization. We realized that although we have a lot of wonderful projects happening here, we still have a ways to go in protecting our rivers and making our abundant water resources central to driving a downtown renaissance. Coming back to Toledo and our precious “Muddy Maumee”, we feel a new sense of stewardship, dedication, appreciation, and hope for the future.

Currents: June


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Patrick Lawrence, Ph.D.
President of Board
Maumee RAC Chair
Associate Professor, University of Toledo

 

Tim Schetter
Vice President / Secretary
Director of Natural Resources, Metroparks of the Toledo Area

 

Colleen Dooley
Treasurer
Attorney, Private Practice

 

Terry Shankland
Board Member
CEO, Shankland's Catering

 

Andrew Curran
Board Member
Assistant Scout Executive, Boy Scouts of America

 

Shawn Reinhart
Board Member
Environmental Manager, Johns Manville

 

Philip Blosser
Board Member
Market Development Manager
Perstorp Polyols

Partners for Clean Streams Inc. is striving for abundant open space and a high quality natural environment; adequate floodwater storage capacities and flourishing wildlife; stakeholders who take local ownership in their resources; and rivers, streams and lakes that are clean, clear and safe